Category Archives: Think

To the parents of girls: It’s not your job 

girl

It’s not your job to tell your daughters not to dress “too sexy.”

It’s not your job to warn your daughters about parties, drinking and hookup culture.

It’s not your job to teach your daughters to avoid walking alone at night.

It’s not your job to teach your daughters to avoid walking alone at anytime.

It’s not your job to tell your daughters to keep their heads down while using public transportation.

It’s not your job to encourage your daughters to say they are in a relationship to avoid unwanted attention.

It’s not your job to teach your daughters to ignore the cat calls.

It’s not your job to tell your daughters smiling or being friendly might be mistaken for wanting something sexual.

It’s not your job to give your daughters whistles, or mace, or a knife or a sharp set of keys.

It’s not your job to teach your daughters how not to get harassed or assaulted or raped.

For far too long we have made women and girls shoulder the burden for the inappropriate and often violent behavior some men inflict upon them. Continue reading

It’s time to pop the bubble

When I was younger, before I had kids, my response to tragic events was to go numb, immerse myself in a protective bubble of denial and go about my life. I wasn’t callous or uncaring. In fact, these events affected me so deeply that the only way I could function was to find a way to bury my emotions until I was ready to dig them up again.

bubblepop (1)

But, bubbles tend to be weak. And, I have other feelings to shield aside from my own. I have two children, who, thus far, have no idea about mass shootings. I am facing the truth of this no longer being a mystery. My oldest will be practicing lock-down drills in his school this week. How much will he learn? I don’t know. But, he will have questions. Questions pricking holes through the bubble. Continue reading

A lesson in patience from a praying mantis

Whoever said, “Patience is a virtue,” probably never had kids. I say probably, because I am too impatient to look it up. See where I am going with this?

praying mantis

Patience. Yeah, that’s not one of my core elements. Before I had kids, I’d be that person, who would run down the stairs, passing a pregnant lady and simultaneously knocking over an elderly disabled person so I could catch a train I probably didn’t really need to make. I lived life in a hurry, and everyone and everything was in my way. My intolerance wasn’t limited to the physically slow, anyone whom I felt lacked my perceived level of comprehension of basic knowledge was also met with disdain.

I know, I was pretty obnoxious. Continue reading

5 reasons to never say, “Enjoy every moment” to a new parent

If you have young children, you have likely heard some iteration of the phrase, “Enjoy every moment,” repeatedly. They are the words uttered to you with a smile by the store cashier as she sees your toddler yanking at your hand. It is the comment on your Facebook post about finally getting the kids to bed.

Notenjoymoment (1)

 

Being a new parent is tough, but not tough enough to ever be sad, angry or even just a tiny bit annoyed by the situation.

That is what you are telling a new parent when you say, “Enjoy every moment.”

Take the time to think about why this phrase is problematic. Continue reading

School’s birthday policy is something to celebrate

I was elated earlier this month, when I received an official packet from my son’s school. The manila envelope was packed with information about his teacher, his bus route, special programs run by the Parent Teacher Association and important dates to remember.

One piece of paper stood out among the rest. A letter from the principal informing parents and guardians about the school’s new policy of not allowing food for classroom celebrations. Instead of bringing in treats, caregivers are asked to work with their child’s teacher to create a special project, game or other fun way to celebrate the birthday. Continue reading

I’m teaching my kids color awareness

We are living in a period of racial tension and turmoil. People have literally died fighting neo-Nazis and other white supremacists. Reading and watching the news is emotionally exhausting, especially for those who feel under attack for being black, Jewish, Muslim, or anything not deemed acceptable by pro-white extremists.

I'm Teaching My Kids Color Awareness

As a parent, I get the desire to not want to deal with this. I get the urge to shield our children from the harsh reality of hate. I had plenty of those moments this month. I just wanted to shut out the world and embrace the joy of my children.

 

Everyone needs a break from the fight. But, even during our breaks, the fight for justice and equity for all rages on. We cannot shield our children from this fight. They need to understand the world we live in.

Continue reading

Kisses not KKK

It’s Sunday afternoon, and I’m catching up on Facebook after spending a lovely morning disconnected from technology and reconnecting with my body and soul.

I was blissfully unaware of the ugliness happening around me. With a quick scroll through Facebook, that ignorance quickly faded away.

I read post after post about Virginia. I see pictures of young men who would rather I not be in this country, let alone exist. It doesn’t matter that I’m a third generation American — more than many of them, I’m sure. It doesn’t matter that both of my grandfathers fought for the United States during World War II. I’m Jewish, so that’s just not good enough. My family isn’t good enough.

Kisses

The fear, worry and anger of my friends is reflected online. As I scroll through my feed, my heart sinks. This is not the world I want for my kids.

Continue reading