Tag Archives: growing up

Stop bitching about how much better being a kid used to be

Being a kid in the 1970s, 80s or 90s was so much better than today, or so says countless essays, listicles and Facebook rants. We played in the street, stayed put until dark and used our imagination instead of iPads. Our parents were stern, but still gave us freedom to explore. We tell our own children of the good old days and wax poetic about how wonderful their lives would have been back then.

Raising children today can never be like it was. Society changes, values evolve, technology grows, new challenges emerge, etc., etc. Our grandparents grew up very differently from our parents, as did our parents from us. Our great grandparents may not have had much of a childhood because, back then, kids were expected to work at a young age.

Our ancestors are looking down on us and wondering what is wrong with us. Our kids are fortunate in so many ways. They are not suffering the burden of a Great Depression or the terror of a World War. And while, as a New Yorker, I do not discount the real fear of terrorism, the truth is, kids in the United States are safer than ever. Instead of bemoaning the fate of our children, let’s give them the childhood they deserve. Continue reading

An amateur guide to potty-training in 5 (mostly) stress-free steps


The title of this post should be clear enough, but just in case, let me begin by stating that I am in no way, shape or form an expert on child elimination strategy . I am just a mom sharing her experiences with potty training her own kid, in the hopes that it may help other parents. If you need a professional opinion, please consult a pediatrician, therapist or other appropriate person.

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Drinks to diapers (a poem)

Remember when being up at four
meant shaking your thing on the dance floor?
And the only bottles in your sight
were filled with vodka, gin and Bud Light?
You knew all the words to every hit song.
Now it’s mostly kiddie sing-a-longs.
Dining out came with no fear
of calming children full of tears.
You could savor the delicious fare.
Now you’re scraping it off the high chair.
And while your life may be a frazzled mess
of sleepless nights and endless stress.
It’s worth it for their smiles and moments of calm,
Until they grow up and say, “Go away, mom!”